Genealogie van de familie Schledorn

Johann Joseph “Joe” SchledornAge: 69 years18921961

Name
Johann Joseph “Joe” Schledorn
Given names
Johann Joseph
Surname
Schledorn
Nickname
Joe
Also known as
John Joseph
Birth September 15, 1892 26 25
Source: WieWasWie
Publication: Website
Text:
BS Geboorte met Johann Joseph Schledorn Kind: Johann Joseph Schledorn Geslacht: Man Geboorteplaats: Enschede Geboortedatum: donderdag 15 september 1892 Vader: Johann Joseph Schledorn Beroep: arbeider Moeder: Johanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen Gebeurtenis: Geboorte Datum: donderdag 15 september 1892 Gebeurtenisplaats: Enschede Documenttype: BS Geboorte Erfgoedinstelling: Historisch Centrum Overijssel Plaats instelling: Zwolle Collectiegebied: Overijssel Archief: 0123 Registratienummer: 3630 Aktenummer: 481 Registratiedatum: 15 september 1892 Akteplaats: Enschede Deze gegevens zijn afkomstig van https://www.wiewaswie.nl/personen-zoeken/zoeken/document/a2apersonid/694753950/srcid/50573866/oid/32
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Death of a brotherFrans Bernard Schledorn
April 29, 1893 (Age 7 months)
Address: Tubantia - Wijk C Enschede
Source: WieWasWie
Publication: Website
Text:
Overledene: Frans Bernard Schledorn Geslacht: Man Geboorteplaats: Enschede Leeftijd: 2 Vader: Johann Joseph Schledorn Moeder: Johanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen Gebeurtenis: Overlijden Datum: zaterdag 29 april 1893 Gebeurtenisplaats: Enschede Documenttype: BS Overlijden Erfgoedinstelling: Historisch Centrum Overijssel Plaats instelling: Zwolle Collectiegebied: Overijssel Archief: 0123 Registratienummer: 4225 Aktenummer: 108 Registratiedatum: 29 april 1893 Akteplaats: Enschede Deze gegevens zijn afkomstig van https://www.wiewaswie.nl/personen-zoeken/zoeken/document/a2apersonid/178604270/srcid/18719591/oid/32
Note: Getuigen:
Birth of a brotherFrans Nicolaas “Frank” Schledorn
December 6, 1894 (Age 2 years)
Address: Tubantia wijk G
Source: Archieven.nl
Text:
0123.3631 Enschede, registers van geboorten Archiefdienst Geboorteakte Geboorte Frans Nicolaas Schledorn, 06-12-1894 Soort akte: Geboorteakte Akteplaats: Enschede Aktedatum: 6-12-1894 Adres: Tubantia wijk G Kind: Frans Nicolaas Schledorn Geslacht: M Vader: Johann Joseph Schledorn Beroep: fabriekarbeider Moeder: Johanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen Toegangsnummer: 0123 Burgerlijke Stand in Overijssel Inventarisnummer: 3631 Aktenummer: 633
Birth of a sisterMaria Johanna Agnes Elizabeth “Marie” Schledorn
April 29, 1897 (Age 4 years)
Birth of a brotherAloysius Theodorus “Al” Schledorn
April 30, 1900 (Age 7 years)
Birth of a brotherBernard Schledorn
August 21, 1902 (Age 9 years)
Source: WieWasWie
Publication: Website
Text:
BS Geboorte met Bernard Schledorn Kind: Bernard Schledorn Geslacht: Man Vader: Johann Joseph Schledorn Beroep: fabriekarbeider Moeder: Johanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen Gebeurtenis: Geboorte Datum: donderdag 21 augustus 1902 Gebeurtenisplaats: Enschede Documenttype: BS Geboorte Erfgoedinstelling: Historisch Centrum Overijssel Plaats instelling: Zwolle Collectiegebied: Overijssel Archief: 0123 Registratienummer: 3635 Aktenummer: 676 Registratiedatum: 21 augustus 1902 Akteplaats: Enschede Opmerking: Minkmaatstraat Deze gegevens zijn afkomstig van https://www.wiewaswie.nl/personen-zoeken/zoeken/document/a2apersonid/714914261/srcid/51893568/oid/32
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Birth of a brothernn Schledorn
Type: stillborn
December 21, 1904 (Age 12 years)
Death of a brothernn Schledorn
December 21, 1904 (Age 12 years)
Birth of a brotherTheodorus “Ted” Schledorn
January 27, 1906 (Age 13 years)
Address: Laareschdwarsweg Enschede
Source: WieWasWie
Publication: Website
Text:
BS Geboorte met Theodorus Schledorn Kind Theodorus Schledorn Geslacht Man Vader Johann Joseph Schledorn Beroep fabriekarbeider Moeder Johanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen Gebeurtenis Geboorte Datum 27-01-1906 Gebeurtenisplaats Enschede Documenttype BS Geboorte Erfgoedinstelling Historisch Centrum Overijssel Plaats instelling Zwolle Collectiegebied Overijssel Archief 0123 Registratienummer 3639 Aktenummer 74 Registratiedatum 29-01-1906 Akteplaats Enschede Collectie Enschede, registers van geboorte
Note: Getuigen:
Death of a paternal grandmotherMaria Agnes Meiering
February 23, 1907 (Age 14 years)
Birth of a sisterBernardina Angela Maria “Dina” Schledorn
June 17, 1908 (Age 15 years)
Publication: http://stadsarchief.enschede.nl/00002/00003/
Text:
Identificatie GL.1908.0278 Datum 17/6/1908 Soort Geboorteakten Toegang Geboorten Lonneker () Plaats Lonneker Aktenummer 278 Aktesoort Geboorte Personen Roeloffsen , Johanna Maria Elisabeth Schledorn , Johann Joseph Schledorn , Bernardina Angela Maria
Emigration before August 14, 1912 (Age 19 years)
Publication: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1368704
Text:
Johan Jozsef Schledorn New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924 Name: Johan Jozsef Schledorn Event Type: Immigration Event Date: 22 Aug 1912 Event Place: Ellis Island, New York City, New York, United States Page Number: 154 Affiliate Line Number: 0021 SS Majestic Sailing From: Southampton, August 14th 1912 Arrving on: Port of New York, 22 aug 1912 1 No on List: 39016 / 21 2 Name in Full Family Name: Schledorn Given Name: Johan Jozef 3 Age Years: 20 Months: 4 Sex: 5 Married or Single: 6 Calling or Occupation: Labourer 7 Able to Read: v Write: yes 8 Nationality: Holland 9 Race or People: Dutch 10 Last Permanent Residence Country: Holland City or Town: Lonneker 11 The name and complete address of nearest relative or friend in country whence alien came: J.J. Schledorn Vanekerweg 2a57(?) Lonneker 12 Final Destination State: ND City or Town: Edmore 13 No on List: 21 14 Whether having a ticket to such final destination: [leeg] 15 By whom was passage paid? Self 16 Whether in posession of $50 and if less, how much? Yes 17 Whether ever before in the United States and is so, when and where? Yes or No: No If Yes Year or period of years: [leeg] Where?: [leeg] 18 Whether going to join a relative or friend and if so, what relative or friend and his name and complete address: Friend Mr Klinmeyer [Kleinmeijer?] Edmore ND 19 Ever in a prison, almshouse, or institution for care and treatment of the insane or supported by charity If so, which? No 20 Whether a polygamist: No 21 Wether an anarchist: No 22 Whether coming by reason of any offer sollicitation [...] or agreement express or implied to labor in the United States: No 23 Condition of health, mental and physical: Good 24 Deformed or crippled. Nature, length of time and cause: No 25 Height Feet: 4 Inches: 2 26 Complexion: Fair 27 Color of Hair: ks(?) Eyes: bl 28 Marks of identification: None 29 Place of birth Country:Holland Town: Enschede Citation "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C9TC-N97P-B?cc=1368704&wc=4X1L-QF5%3A1600512343 : 26 January 2018), Roll 1918, vol 4275-4277, 21 Aug 1912 > image 648 of 1052; citing NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). Catalog Record Passenger and crew lists of vessels arriving at New York, 1897-1942; index to passenger lists of vessels arriving at New York, June 16, 1897- June 30, 1902 ; index (soundex) to passenger lists of vessels arriving at New York, July 1, 1902-July 1, 1948 Film/Digital Note: v. 4275-4277 Aug 21 1912 (NARA Series T715, Roll 1918) https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/341057
Note: RMS Majestic (1889)

Residence before August 14, 1912 (Age 19 years)

Address: 029-78 040-56
Immigration August 22, 1912 (Age 19 years)
Publication: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1368704
Text:
Johan Jozsef Schledorn New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924 Name: Johan Jozsef Schledorn Event Type: Immigration Event Date: 22 Aug 1912 Event Place: Ellis Island, New York City, New York, United States Page Number: 154 Affiliate Line Number: 0021 SS Majestic Sailing From: Southampton, August 14th 1912 Arrving on: Port of New York, 22 aug 1912 1 No on List: 39016 / 21 2 Name in Full Family Name: Schledorn Given Name: Johan Jozef 3 Age Years: 20 Months: 4 Sex: m 5 Married or Single: s 6 Calling or Occupation: Labourer 7 Able to Read: v Write: yes 8 Nationality: Holland 9 Race or People: Dutch 10 Last Permanent Residence Country: Holland City or Town: Lonneker 11 The name and complete address of nearest relative or friend in country whence alien came: J.J. Schledorn Vanekerweg 2a57[?] Lonneker 12 Final Destination State: ND City or Town: Edmore 13 No on List: 21 14 Whether having a ticket to such final destination: [leeg] 15 By whom was passage paid? Self 16 Whether in posession of $50 and if less, how much? Yes 17 Whether ever before in the United States and is so, when and where? Yes or No: No If Yes Year or period of years: [leeg] Where?: [leeg] 18 Whether going to join a relative or friend and if so, what relative or friend and his name and complete address: Friend Mr Klinmeyer Edmore ND 19 Ever in a prison, almshouse, or institution for care and treatment of the insane or supported by charity If so, which? No 20 Whether a polygamist: No 21 Wether an anarchist: No 22 Whether coming by reason of any offer sollicitation [...] or agreement express or implied to labor in the United States: No 23 Condition of health, mental and physical: Good 24 Deformed or crippled. Nature, length of time and cause: No 25 Height Feet: 4 Inches: 2 26 Complexion: Fair 27 Color of Hair: ks(?) Eyes: bl 28 Marks of identification: None 29 Place of birth Country:Holland Town: Enschede Citation "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C9TC-N97P-B?cc=1368704&wc=4X1L-QF5%3A1600512343 : 26 January 2018), Roll 1918, vol 4275-4277, 21 Aug 1912 > image 648 of 1052; citing NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). Catalog Record Passenger and crew lists of vessels arriving at New York, 1897-1942; index to passenger lists of vessels arriving at New York, June 16, 1897- June 30, 1902 ; index (soundex) to passenger lists of vessels arriving at New York, July 1, 1902-July 1, 1948 Film/Digital Note: v. 4275-4277 Aug 21 1912 (NARA Series T715, Roll 1918) https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/341057
Quality of data: primary evidence
Note: RMS Majestic (1889)

Civil marriageAlice Lenora “Alice” JohnsonView this family
May 20, 1921 (Age 28 years)
Publication: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1452395
Text:
Joe Schledorn mentioned in the record of Joe Schledorn and Alice Johnson Name Joe Schledorn Age (Expanded) 28 years Birth Year 1893 Birthplace Enshede, Holland Spouse's Name Alice Johnson Spouse's Age (Expanded) 30 years Spouse's Birth Year 1891 Spouse's Birthplace Park River, N.Dak. Event Date 20 May 1921 Event Place Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan Father's Name Joe Schledorn Mother's Name Marie Roelofson Spouse's Father's Name John Johnson Spouse's Mother's Name Not Known Citing this Record "Michigan Marriages, 1868-1925," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NQM3-3JS : accessed 27 March 2016), Joe Schledorn and Alice Johnson, 20 May 1921; citing Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan, v 6 rn 261, Department of Vital Records, Lansing; FHL microfilm 2,342,745.
Death of a brotherBernard Schledorn
September 1, 1921 (Age 28 years)
Publication: https://apps.nd.gov/doh/certificates/deathCertSearch.htm
Text:
Search Results Name (Last, First Middle) SCHLEDORN, BERNARD Date of Death 09/01/1921 County of Death Ramsey Gender MALE Age 19 Years Date of Birth 08/21/1902 State of Residence North Dakota County of Residence Ramsey Action Purchase a Certified Copy
Death of a motherJohanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen
November 25, 1921 (Age 29 years)
Source: WieWasWie
Publication: Website
Text:
Overledene: Johanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen Geslacht: Vrouw Geboorteplaats: Gescher (D) Leeftijd: 54 Relatie: Johann Joseph Schledorn Relatiesoort: Partner Vader: Carl Roeloffsen Moeder: Elisabeth Paul Gebeurtenis: Overlijden Datum: vrijdag 25 november 1921 Gebeurtenisplaats: Lonneker Documenttype: BS Overlijden Erfgoedinstelling: Historisch Centrum Overijssel Plaats instelling: Zwolle Collectiegebied: Overijssel Archief: 0123 Registratienummer: 8788 Aktenummer: 179 Registratiedatum: 25 november 1921 Akteplaats: Lonneker Deze gegevens zijn afkomstig van https://www.wiewaswie.nl/personen-zoeken/zoeken/document/a2apersonid/184317878/srcid/21469029/oid/32
Birth of a daughter
#1
Janet Louise “Janet” Schledorn
December 20, 1923 (Age 31 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Publication: Website
Text:
Janet Louise Schledorn Holdburg Birth: Dec. 20, 1923 Michigan, USA Death: Apr. 8, 2006 California, USA Janet Louise Holdburg, age 82 of Stockton, CA, passed away Saturday, April 8,2006 at Wagner Heights. She was born December 20, 1923 in Port Huron, MI. Janet served in the U.S. Army as a 1st lieutenant during WWII and was a registered nurse for over 40 years before retiring. She is survived by her children, 2 sons in Arizona, one son in Georgia, a son and a daughter in Stockton. She is also survived by 9 grandchildren,; 3 great-grandchildren, Her husband, Ralph and son, Doug Holdburg preceded her in death. Private Services and Interment will be at Fairhaven Memorial Park in Santa Ana, CA. Adapted from obit published in The Record on 4/16/2006. Family links: Parents: Johan Joseph Schledorn (1882 - 1966) Alice Lenore Johnson Schledorn (1888 - 1976) Spouse: Ralph Jesse Holdburg (1922 - 1970) Burial: Fairhaven Memorial Park Santa Ana Orange County California, USA Created by: J Record added: Nov 27, 2015 Find A Grave Memorial# 155434737
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Death of a brotherTheodorus “Ted” Schledorn
June 5, 1929 (Age 36 years)
Publication: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1968532
Text:
Theodore Schledorn Michigan Death Certificates Name Theodore Schledorn Event Type Death Event Date 05 Jun 1929 Event Place Waterford, Oakland, Michigan, United States Gender Male Age 23 Marital Status Married Birth Date 27 Jan 1906 Birthplace Holland Birth Year (Estimated) 1906 Father's Name John J Schledorn Mother's Name Marie Roeloffzen Citing this Record "Michigan Death Certificates, 1921-1952," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFQP-QNQ : accessed 27 March 2016), Theodore Schledorn, 05 Jun 1929; citing Waterford, Oakland, Michigan, United States, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing; FHL microfilm 1,973,046.
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Publication: http://seekingmichigan.org/
Text:
County Oakland City/village/township Waterford Last Name Schledorn Given Name Theodore Birth Year 1906 Age 23 Death Day 5 Death Month Jun Death Year 1929 Father's Given Name John J Father's Last Name Schledorn Mother's Given Name Marie Mother's Last Name Roeloffzen Rights Certified copies of this record are available from the Michigan Department of Community Health’s Vital Records Office: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch/0,1607,7-132-4645---,00.html.
Quality of data: primary evidence
Burial of a brotherTheodorus “Ted” Schledorn
June 7, 1929 (Age 36 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Publication: Website
Text:
Theodore Schledorn Birth: 1906 Death: 1929 Burial: Metamora Cemetery Metamora Lapeer County Michigan, USA Edit Virtual Cemetery info [?] Created by: Jack Vander-Schrier Record added: Aug 13, 2006 Find A Grave Memorial# 15326641
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Publication: http://seekingmichigan.org/
Text:
County Oakland City/village/township Waterford Last Name Schledorn Given Name Theodore Birth Year 1906 Age 23 Death Day 5 Death Month Jun Death Year 1929 Father's Given Name John J Father's Last Name Schledorn Mother's Given Name Marie Mother's Last Name Roeloffzen Rights Certified copies of this record are available from the Michigan Department of Community Health’s Vital Records Office: http://www.michigan.gov/mdch/0,1607,7-132-4645---,00.html. Item ID 005240298_02991
Quality of data: primary evidence
Census April 1940 (Age 47 years)
Military service
Fourth draft conducted on April 27, 1942
1942 (Age 49 years)

Publication: Name index and images of cards for men, age 45-64 (born 1877-1897), included in the fourth draft conducted on April 27, 1942. The indexed portion of this publication currently includes the states of Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York Bronx, New York Kings, New York Manhattan, New York Queens, New York Staten Island, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. This collection is part of National Archives Record Group 147, Records of the Selective Service System, 1940-. Index and images for Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington courtesy of Ancestry.com. In August of 2013, the National Archives replaced the ARC – Archival Research Catalog - with the OPA – Online Public Access. ARC identifiers will still work to access the collections in OPA. https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/1861144
Text:
John Joseph Schledorn United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 Name: John Joseph Schledorn Event Type: Draft Registration Event Date: 1942 Event Place: Auburn, Oakland, Michigan, United States Residence Place: Auburn, Oakland, Michigan Gender: Male Employer: John Joseph/Schledorn Birth Date: 15 Sep 1892 --- Document Information: Affiliate Publication Title World War II Draft Cards (4th Registration) for the State of Michigan Affiliate ARC Identifier 623283 Digital Folder Number 004673216 Image Number 00343 Citing this Record "United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4SF-B6D : 8 November 2017), John Joseph Schledorn, 1942; citing NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
Death of a fatherJohann Joseph Schledorn
December 31, 1944 (Age 52 years)
Publication: http://home.caiway.nl/~bjmnijka/index.html
Text:
IV-c Johann Joseph Schledorn is geboren op 19-01-1866 in Crommert (Pruissen), zoon van Johann Bernard Schledorn (zie III) en Maria Agnes Mei(j)ering. Johann is overleden op 31-12-1944 in Pontiac (Michigan) [USA], 78 jaar oud. Adressen: Tubantia wijk G Richterweg, Enschede buurtschap Lonneker Johann trouwde, 22 jaar oud, op 08-11-1888 in Enschede met Johanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen, 21 jaar oud. Johanna is geboren op 19-03-1867 in Gescher (Pruissen), dochter van Carl Roeloffsen en Elisabeth Paul. Johanna is overleden op 25-11-1921 om 05:00 in Lonneker, 54 jaar oud. Van het overlijden is aangifte gedaan op 25-11-1921. Bij de overlijdensaangifte van Johanna waren de volgende getuigen aanwezig: Gerrit Jan Balster (geb. ±1873) en Klaas de Vos (geb. ±1896).
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Publication: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1968532
Text:
John Schledorn Michigan Death Certificates Name John Schledorn Event Type Death Event Date 31 Dec 1944 Event Place Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan, United States Gender Male Age 78 Marital Status Widowed Birth Date 19 Jan 1866 Birthplace Germany Birth Year (Estimated) 1866 Father's Name Bernard Schledorn Mother's Name Marie Meiering Citing this Record "Michigan Death Certificates, 1921-1952," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:KFQY-DVX : accessed 27 March 2016), John Schledorn, 31 Dec 1944; citing Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan, United States, Division for Vital Records and Health Statistics, Lansing; FHL microfilm 1,973,058.
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Birth of a grandson
#1
Douglas L. “Doug” Holdburg
July 10, 1950 (Age 57 years)
Text:
Douglas L Holdburg California Death Index, 1940-1997 Name: Douglas L Holdburg Event Type: Death Event Date: 20 May 1993 Event Place: San Bernardino, California, United States Birth Date: 10 Jul 1950 Birthplace: Michigan Gender: Male Mother's Name: Schledorn Citing this Record "California Death Index, 1940-1997," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VPZW-GGR : 26 November 2014), Douglas L Holdburg, 20 May 1993; Department of Public Health Services, Sacramento.
Death December 6, 1961 (Age 69 years)
Source: Find a Grave
Publication: Website
Text:
Johan Joseph "John" Schledorn Birth: Sep. 15, 1882, Netherlands Death: Dec. 5, 1966 Orange County California, USA Family links: Spouse: Alice Lenore Johnson Schledorn (1888 - 1976) Children: Janet Louise Schledorn Holdburg (1923 - 2006)* *Calculated relationship Burial:Cremated, Location of ashes is unknown. Plot: If anyone knows, let me know Created by: J Record added: Apr 03, 2015 Find A Grave Memorial# 144523225
Quality of data: secondary evidence
Text:
John J Schledorn California Death Index, 1940-1997 Name: John J Schledorn Event Type: Death Event Date: 06 Dec 1961 Event Place: Orange, California, United States Birth Date: 15 Sep 1892 Birthplace: Netherlands Gender: Male Mother's Name: Rollefso Citing this Record "California Death Index, 1940-1997," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VP49-8LC : 26 November 2014), John J Schledorn, 06 Dec 1961; Department of Public Health Services, Sacramento.
Family with parents - View this family
father
mother
Marriage: November 8, 1888Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
4 months
elder brother
Karel Joseph Schledorn
Birth: March 2, 1889 23 21Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
Death: March 21, 1889Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
16 months
elder brother
Frans Bernard Schledorn
Birth: July 1, 1890 24 23Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
Death: April 29, 1893Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
2 years
himself
2 years
younger brother
2 years
younger sister
3 years
younger brother
2 years
younger brother
Bernard Schledorn
Birth: August 21, 1902 36 35Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
Death: September 1, 1921Ramsey County, North Dakota, USA
2 years
younger brother
nn Schledorn
Birth: December 21, 1904 38 37Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
Death: December 21, 1904Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
13 months
younger brother
Theodorus “Ted” Schledorn
Birth: January 27, 1906 40 38Enschede, Overijssel, Nederland
Death: June 5, 1929Waterford, Oakland, Michigan, United States of America
2 years
younger sister
Family with Alice Lenora “Alice” Johnson - View this family
himself
wife
Marriage: May 20, 1921Pontiac, Oakland County, Michigan, United States of America
3 years
daughter

BirthWieWasWie
Publication: Website
Text:
BS Geboorte met Johann Joseph Schledorn Kind: Johann Joseph Schledorn Geslacht: Man Geboorteplaats: Enschede Geboortedatum: donderdag 15 september 1892 Vader: Johann Joseph Schledorn Beroep: arbeider Moeder: Johanna Maria Elisabeth Roeloffsen Gebeurtenis: Geboorte Datum: donderdag 15 september 1892 Gebeurtenisplaats: Enschede Documenttype: BS Geboorte Erfgoedinstelling: Historisch Centrum Overijssel Plaats instelling: Zwolle Collectiegebied: Overijssel Archief: 0123 Registratienummer: 3630 Aktenummer: 481 Registratiedatum: 15 september 1892 Akteplaats: Enschede Deze gegevens zijn afkomstig van https://www.wiewaswie.nl/personen-zoeken/zoeken/document/a2apersonid/694753950/srcid/50573866/oid/32
Quality of data: secondary evidence
EmigrationNew York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924
Publication: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1368704
Text:
Johan Jozsef Schledorn New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924 Name: Johan Jozsef Schledorn Event Type: Immigration Event Date: 22 Aug 1912 Event Place: Ellis Island, New York City, New York, United States Page Number: 154 Affiliate Line Number: 0021 SS Majestic Sailing From: Southampton, August 14th 1912 Arrving on: Port of New York, 22 aug 1912 1 No on List: 39016 / 21 2 Name in Full Family Name: Schledorn Given Name: Johan Jozef 3 Age Years: 20 Months: 4 Sex: 5 Married or Single: 6 Calling or Occupation: Labourer 7 Able to Read: v Write: yes 8 Nationality: Holland 9 Race or People: Dutch 10 Last Permanent Residence Country: Holland City or Town: Lonneker 11 The name and complete address of nearest relative or friend in country whence alien came: J.J. Schledorn Vanekerweg 2a57(?) Lonneker 12 Final Destination State: ND City or Town: Edmore 13 No on List: 21 14 Whether having a ticket to such final destination: [leeg] 15 By whom was passage paid? Self 16 Whether in posession of $50 and if less, how much? Yes 17 Whether ever before in the United States and is so, when and where? Yes or No: No If Yes Year or period of years: [leeg] Where?: [leeg] 18 Whether going to join a relative or friend and if so, what relative or friend and his name and complete address: Friend Mr Klinmeyer [Kleinmeijer?] Edmore ND 19 Ever in a prison, almshouse, or institution for care and treatment of the insane or supported by charity If so, which? No 20 Whether a polygamist: No 21 Wether an anarchist: No 22 Whether coming by reason of any offer sollicitation [...] or agreement express or implied to labor in the United States: No 23 Condition of health, mental and physical: Good 24 Deformed or crippled. Nature, length of time and cause: No 25 Height Feet: 4 Inches: 2 26 Complexion: Fair 27 Color of Hair: ks(?) Eyes: bl 28 Marks of identification: None 29 Place of birth Country:Holland Town: Enschede Citation "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C9TC-N97P-B?cc=1368704&wc=4X1L-QF5%3A1600512343 : 26 January 2018), Roll 1918, vol 4275-4277, 21 Aug 1912 > image 648 of 1052; citing NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). Catalog Record Passenger and crew lists of vessels arriving at New York, 1897-1942; index to passenger lists of vessels arriving at New York, June 16, 1897- June 30, 1902 ; index (soundex) to passenger lists of vessels arriving at New York, July 1, 1902-July 1, 1948 Film/Digital Note: v. 4275-4277 Aug 21 1912 (NARA Series T715, Roll 1918) https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/341057
ImmigrationNew York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924
Publication: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1368704
Text:
Johan Jozsef Schledorn New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924 Name: Johan Jozsef Schledorn Event Type: Immigration Event Date: 22 Aug 1912 Event Place: Ellis Island, New York City, New York, United States Page Number: 154 Affiliate Line Number: 0021 SS Majestic Sailing From: Southampton, August 14th 1912 Arrving on: Port of New York, 22 aug 1912 1 No on List: 39016 / 21 2 Name in Full Family Name: Schledorn Given Name: Johan Jozef 3 Age Years: 20 Months: 4 Sex: m 5 Married or Single: s 6 Calling or Occupation: Labourer 7 Able to Read: v Write: yes 8 Nationality: Holland 9 Race or People: Dutch 10 Last Permanent Residence Country: Holland City or Town: Lonneker 11 The name and complete address of nearest relative or friend in country whence alien came: J.J. Schledorn Vanekerweg 2a57[?] Lonneker 12 Final Destination State: ND City or Town: Edmore 13 No on List: 21 14 Whether having a ticket to such final destination: [leeg] 15 By whom was passage paid? Self 16 Whether in posession of $50 and if less, how much? Yes 17 Whether ever before in the United States and is so, when and where? Yes or No: No If Yes Year or period of years: [leeg] Where?: [leeg] 18 Whether going to join a relative or friend and if so, what relative or friend and his name and complete address: Friend Mr Klinmeyer Edmore ND 19 Ever in a prison, almshouse, or institution for care and treatment of the insane or supported by charity If so, which? No 20 Whether a polygamist: No 21 Wether an anarchist: No 22 Whether coming by reason of any offer sollicitation [...] or agreement express or implied to labor in the United States: No 23 Condition of health, mental and physical: Good 24 Deformed or crippled. Nature, length of time and cause: No 25 Height Feet: 4 Inches: 2 26 Complexion: Fair 27 Color of Hair: ks(?) Eyes: bl 28 Marks of identification: None 29 Place of birth Country:Holland Town: Enschede Citation "New York Passenger Arrival Lists (Ellis Island), 1892-1924," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3Q9M-C9TC-N97P-B?cc=1368704&wc=4X1L-QF5%3A1600512343 : 26 January 2018), Roll 1918, vol 4275-4277, 21 Aug 1912 > image 648 of 1052; citing NARA microfilm publication T715 and M237 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.). Catalog Record Passenger and crew lists of vessels arriving at New York, 1897-1942; index to passenger lists of vessels arriving at New York, June 16, 1897- June 30, 1902 ; index (soundex) to passenger lists of vessels arriving at New York, July 1, 1902-July 1, 1948 Film/Digital Note: v. 4275-4277 Aug 21 1912 (NARA Series T715, Roll 1918) https://www.familysearch.org/search/catalog/341057
Quality of data: primary evidence
MarriageMichigan Marriages, 1868-1925
Publication: https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1452395
Text:
Joe Schledorn mentioned in the record of Joe Schledorn and Alice Johnson Name Joe Schledorn Age (Expanded) 28 years Birth Year 1893 Birthplace Enshede, Holland Spouse's Name Alice Johnson Spouse's Age (Expanded) 30 years Spouse's Birth Year 1891 Spouse's Birthplace Park River, N.Dak. Event Date 20 May 1921 Event Place Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan Father's Name Joe Schledorn Mother's Name Marie Roelofson Spouse's Father's Name John Johnson Spouse's Mother's Name Not Known Citing this Record "Michigan Marriages, 1868-1925," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NQM3-3JS : accessed 27 March 2016), Joe Schledorn and Alice Johnson, 20 May 1921; citing Pontiac, Oakland, Michigan, v 6 rn 261, Department of Vital Records, Lansing; FHL microfilm 2,342,745.
Military serviceUnited States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942
Publication: Name index and images of cards for men, age 45-64 (born 1877-1897), included in the fourth draft conducted on April 27, 1942. The indexed portion of this publication currently includes the states of Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York Bronx, New York Kings, New York Manhattan, New York Queens, New York Staten Island, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, Rhode Island, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. This collection is part of National Archives Record Group 147, Records of the Selective Service System, 1940-. Index and images for Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington courtesy of Ancestry.com. In August of 2013, the National Archives replaced the ARC – Archival Research Catalog - with the OPA – Online Public Access. ARC identifiers will still work to access the collections in OPA. https://www.familysearch.org/search/collection/1861144
Text:
John Joseph Schledorn United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942 Name: John Joseph Schledorn Event Type: Draft Registration Event Date: 1942 Event Place: Auburn, Oakland, Michigan, United States Residence Place: Auburn, Oakland, Michigan Gender: Male Employer: John Joseph/Schledorn Birth Date: 15 Sep 1892 --- Document Information: Affiliate Publication Title World War II Draft Cards (4th Registration) for the State of Michigan Affiliate ARC Identifier 623283 Digital Folder Number 004673216 Image Number 00343 Citing this Record "United States World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942," database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4SF-B6D : 8 November 2017), John Joseph Schledorn, 1942; citing NARA microfilm publication M1936, M1937, M1939, M1951, M1962, M1964, M1986, M2090, and M2097 (Washington D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, n.d.).
DeathFind a Grave
Publication: Website
Text:
Johan Joseph "John" Schledorn Birth: Sep. 15, 1882, Netherlands Death: Dec. 5, 1966 Orange County California, USA Family links: Spouse: Alice Lenore Johnson Schledorn (1888 - 1976) Children: Janet Louise Schledorn Holdburg (1923 - 2006)* *Calculated relationship Burial:Cremated, Location of ashes is unknown. Plot: If anyone knows, let me know Created by: J Record added: Apr 03, 2015 Find A Grave Memorial# 144523225
Quality of data: secondary evidence
DeathCalifornia Death Index, 1940-1997
Text:
John J Schledorn California Death Index, 1940-1997 Name: John J Schledorn Event Type: Death Event Date: 06 Dec 1961 Event Place: Orange, California, United States Birth Date: 15 Sep 1892 Birthplace: Netherlands Gender: Male Mother's Name: Rollefso Citing this Record "California Death Index, 1940-1997," database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:VP49-8LC : 26 November 2014), John J Schledorn, 06 Dec 1961; Department of Public Health Services, Sacramento.
Emigration
RMS Majestic (1889) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Majestic_(1889)
Immigration
RMS Majestic (1889) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Majestic_(1889)
Immigration
Just How Were Passenger Manifests Created? Immigration to the United States Sallyann Sack-Pikus: What papers did a prospective immigrant have to show when he bought passage to the U.S from Europe? We Jews have heard a couple of seemingly contradictory things. For example, one of my grandfathers told me that he adopted the name Steinsnider (although his real name was Dubner), because he was “running away from the Russian army and bought papers from a guy named Steinsnider.” To me that suggests that he had to (or thought he had to) show some sort of papers when he purchased passage—and that the clerk who compiled the manifest used those papers to make the entry for my grandfather. In other words, the manifest information was taken from written (not oral) material. On the other hand, we have heard numerous stories about Jewish men “sneaking” over the border to get out of Russia, presumably not showing papers to anyone on exit. Retired Hamburg, Germany, city archivist, Jurgen Sielemann once gave a talk at a conference in which he described how Hamburg ticket agents would go into Kovna guberniya, sell tickets, and arrange for the men to sneak over the border. That scenario suggests to me that they did not necessarily have to show documents and that some/many/most manifests may have been compiled by clerks who listened to information given orally to them prior to passage by the emigrants. And then there was the question of woman and children who came later and did not sneak across the border. Did they need documents in order to leave? Marian Smith: The answers to your questions depend on when, where, and to whom. Prior to 1918, the United States did not require an immigrant to show any document to U.S. authorities at the port of arrival other than the manifest submitted by the ship captain (more on that below). That said, many immigrants were asked by the immigrant inspector to produce a letter mailed within 90 days from the friend or relative at their destination, just to confirm that they were expected. Similarly, the steamship companies required no documents. Most tickets were purchased from agents and not directly from the company. The agents obviously would have preferred to compile their information from written documents so, in any case, may have written part or all of the manifest information by copying from another document. It was the ticket agent who forwarded the information to the steamship company whose clerks then used the agent’s records to compile the passenger list. In the case of pre‑paid tickets, the immigrant’s information came from his or her husband/brother/cousin in Baltimore (or some other U.S. city) rather from him or herself. The immigrant just collected the ticket before departing. Foreign exit document requirements varied widely by country. For example, Russia required male emigrants to obtain an exit permit before they could leave; to get one, they had to have completed their required military service. The Russian government also had an understanding (if not a formal agreement) with the railroads and shipping companies not to sell tickets to anyone who could not produce an exit permit showing military service. Hence, the common story of young men who bought or otherwise obtained someone else’s military papers to get an exit permit. Once they did so, they had to buy the ticket under that assumed name. Once that was done, the U.S. manifest would appear with that name. Unfortunately for us genealogists, they got off the boat and became their old selves again—that is, took back their true names. In other words, without other information, one cannot know whether the name on a manifest was the true name or a purchased name—and, if different from the name used after immigration, the original name or one that simply was adopted! Sneaking out? One can see how the exit permit requirement led to some illegal emigration. This was made much easier by ticket agents in Germany and others in Marseilles who established smuggling routes out of Russia. Once outside Russia, the emigrants could buy tickets without the permit (since the requirement applied only to tickets purchased in Russia). Given this whole scheme, one can only imagine the information (fact or fiction) the immigrant provided to a ticket agent. These smuggling schemes not only evaded the exit permit requirements, but also other European (mainly German) entry/exit regulations involving medical checks, fees, and so forth. In other words, ticket agents worked as hard to get clients into Germany as out of Russia. Dependent women and children obviously were not subject to the military service requirement, so the exit permit was not such a hurdle. They needed only ticket money and someone to receive them. They were the perfect candidates for a pre‑paid ticket. All the above mainly applies to immigration from around 1892 to 1918. Sack: The old “name was changed at Ellis Island” statement came up repeatedly at my talk. People really did not want to believe that no American immigration inspector ever changed names—although, of course, many immigrants themselves did so after they left Ellis Island. In fact, am I right that a law actually forbade inspectors to do this? Smith: Not a law, but internal agency guidance. It dictated that no marks or writing were to be made on the manifests except for blue grease pencil marks or writing from the inspector during and regarding inspection (that is, check marks, X’s for detained, etc.); red grease pencil or pen marks/writing made later by verification clerks (annotations for verification, etc); corrections (spelling, name, or other) only as authorized and directed by the commissioner in Washington. Actually, prior to 1911, no one really cared too much about the names. They wanted them to be accurate, but it was hardly a priority. I cringe whenever I hear anyone talk about how the inspectors at Ellis Island “asked 29 questions.” This is ridiculous, since the inspectors only had a matter of seconds to determine eligibility. Because no legal requirements regarding names existed, any questions on that matter would have been irrelevant. There was no time to discuss names or amend records. Rather, inspectors asked about age, money, jobs, and health. When the certificate of arrival requirement was enacted in 1911, the Immigration Bureau realized what a nightmare it would be to locate all these mangled names years after arrival. (The Basic Naturalization Act of 1906 included the certificate of arrival requirement, which applied to immigrants admitted after June 29, 1906. These people became eligible for naturalization in 1911—five years later—and so inundated the Immigration Service with verification requests.) From then on, they paid more attention to names, although the system still depended on the steamship companies to prepare the names properly. The law required full and complete manifests. If the names were found to be careless or wrong, that would not be full and complete, and that would leave the company open to fines by the government for each violation. The government could enforce the law more stringently and bring about a change on the part of the carrier. Starting in 1918, the manifests were prepared from passports; from 1917 onward, the manifests were typed, so the names on them should have matched the names (and spellings) on the passports. (Beginning in 1918, the United States required all arriving aliens to present a passport issued to them by their government—or maybe by some other government who for some reason gave them one.) Missing Ellis Island Cabin-Class Manifests, 1897–1903 In the JewishGen Digest of December 22, 2008, a researcher asked for a “definitive answer” to the question (paraphrased): “Are Ellis Island passenger manifests perfectly complete?” Marian Smith replied on her blog with the following essay: No, as always, nothing is perfect. But we do have some knowledge to guide us. Records and/or information can be missing for a variety of reasons, some more prevalent in certain eras than in others. The researcher did not give a date for the passenger list he sought, but the biggest question at the moment seems to surround Ellis Island lists at the turn of the century, circa 1897 to 1903, and the presence or absence of cabin-class passenger lists. The question boils down to the disposition of cabin-class (i.e., first class, second class, and saloon, as opposed to third class/steerage) passenger lists upon the ship’s arrival in New York Harbor. Another writer suggested that cabin-class lists followed cabin-class passengers to the dock where they were discharged and, thus, like the passengers, never went to Ellis Island. Whether the cabin lists ever got to Ellis Island or not, I cannot say. What is clear is that the majority of cabin-class lists for those years were not maintained at the immigration station and were not microfilmed. This is not a myth. It is a demonstrable fact. Before we get to the data, let’s review the collection of passenger lists in New York at the time: Prior to 1892, the Customs Service only collected the Federal passenger lists (Customs Lists) and filed them at the Customs House. Presumably, these lists included all passengers in all classes. From January 1892 to June 1897 (and somewhat later), the U.S. federal government collected two lists, both of which should have listed all passengers. One went with the customs collector to the Customs House, and the other went with an immigrant inspector to Ellis Island. We do not know if the immigration lists included all passengers or only steerage (third-class) passengers, as no immigration lists from these years survive. On June 14/15, 1897, a fire completely destroyed Ellis Island and all the immigration passenger manifests stored there. From June 15, 1897, to about January 1903, immigration inspectors continued to collect steerage passenger lists and file them at Ellis Island. They may also have collected cabin passenger lists. If they collected the cabin lists, they did not file them with the steerage records and (as a rule) did not maintain the cabin-class records. Since the cabin lists are not found among Ellis Island records, they may (or may not) have gone to the dock with the passengers. After about January 1903, immigrant inspectors collected all classes of passenger lists and filed them at Ellis Island. Although some errors, omissions, and loss continued, for the most part, one can consider the lists since 1903 to be complete in terms of documenting all classes of passengers. Following the 1897 Ellis Island fire, the Immigration Service relied upon Customs Lists to verify New York arrivals from January 1892 to June 1897. The New York passenger lists available for those dates at the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), or online, are in fact Customs Lists. Why didn’t the Immigration Service collect or maintain cabin lists prior to 1903? We do not know for sure. We do know that from 1892 to 1924 standard Ellis Island procedure included inspection of cabin-class passengers aboard ship and of steerage passengers at the island station. The National Park Service (www.nps.gov/archive/stli/ serv02. htm) agrees: First- and second-class passengers who arrived in New York Harbor were not required to undergo the inspection process at Ellis Island. Instead, these passengers underwent a cursory inspection aboard ship; the theory being that if a person could afford to purchase a first or second class ticket, they were less likely to become a public charge in America due to medical or legal reasons. The Federal government felt that these more affluent passengers would not end up in institutions, hospitals, or become a burden to the state. However, first- and second-class passengers were sent to Ellis Island for further inspection if they were sick or had legal problems. Part of the government’s rationale was that the majority of cabin passengers were U.S. citizens and returning residents. While I might argue that cabin passengers were not fully inspected until about 1894, that is beside the point. We assume they were manifested, because the government collected and reported statistics by passenger class, and the traditional source for such statistics is the passenger manifest. The New York Times of January 1, 1893 (page 8), printed these statistics from an official Ellis Island statement. Why do I only assume these statistics came from the manifests? First, because official U.S. immigration statistics have been compiled from manifests (by law) since 1820. Second, I hesitate only because there is a small chance that the numbers could have been provided by the steamship companies. The Transatlantic Passenger Conference (steamship lines) provided passenger statistics by class to the U.S. federal government for the years 1899 to the mid‑1940s. No evidence exists to show that the Transatlantic Passenger Conference collected or reported such data to the government (or anyone else) prior to 1899, but the remote possibility cannot be excluded.1 By comparing the statistics provided by the shipping lines to actual manifests, one can determine if New York passenger lists of 1897 (or at least 1899) to 1903 are complete. We find that not only are the majority of cabin-class passengers missing from the Ellis Island set in these years, we can (surprisingly) begin to predict the likelihood of finding a given passenger on those lists depending on their port of departure and/or shipping line. I first compiled the data from the shipping lines regarding New York arrivals for 1899, 1900, 1902, 1903, and 1906.2 The 1899 data table below demonstrates the pattern for these years: Except for the Hamburg American’s Union Line sailings from Hamburg, ships sailing from Mediterranean ports had the highest percentage of passengers traveling in steerage. Ships from Continental ports usually had a lower percentage, and ships from British ports had the lowest percentage of steerage passengers. If only steerage manifests survive, it means passengers from the Mediterranean ports are more likely to be found than passengers from British ports, because they are more likely to be listed on a steerage manifest. I then compared the shipping line data for individual ship arrivals with the digitized records for that ship arrival found on Ancestry.com. The table at the top of the next column shows data for three ships, one each from Britain, the Mediterranean, and the Continent. The American Line’s St. Louis from Southampton carried 373 passengers, yet only 183 of them appear on the surviving manifest. The one second-class passenger appears only because he is crossed off a steerage list with the annotation “transferred to second cabin.” In contrast, the Fabre Line’s Chateau Yquem from the Mediterranean carried 286 steerage and 3 cabin passengers. All, including the three cabin passengers on their own list, appear on the manifest. Yet even if Ellis Island failed to preserve the page of the cabin-class passengers, the Chateau Yquem’s manifest still would be more than 98 percent complete. Sadly, the Furst Bismarck from Hamburg carried fewer than one-third of her passengers in steerage, leaving more than 532 passenger names out of the surviving records and databases. The first 1900 example is the Allan State Line’s Sardinian, which arrived at the port of New York on September 27, 1900: The result in this example is clear. The Sardinian carried approximately 187 individuals to New York, but the surviving passenger list records document only 17 of those passengers—and 17 is the exact number of steerage passengers carried by the Sardinian. Thus, a manifest record survives for only 9 percent of that ship’s passengers, leaving out some 170 names. If Grampa’s naturalization papers say he arrived on that ship, and you haven’t found him among the 17 listed, you can stop looking. The second ship example from 1900 is the Hamburg American Regular Service. (The Hamburg America Line offered two types of service, regular and express. Express was faster and more expensive.) The shipping lines show that the Georgia arrived on June 12, 1900, although Ancestry.com says that the arrival date was June 11: The point to note here, aside from the fact that Ancestry found more names than the lines reported (there may have been duplicates), is that all this ship’s passengers traveled steerage and so all are documented. Further analysis of all the 1900 New York shipping line data shows that ships sailing from different ports offered different accommodations. (See table at <http://web. mac.com/ms5/iWeb/MarianSmith.com/Tables.html>. Ships from the Mediterranean tended to have all (as above) or the vast majority of passengers booked in steerage. Ships sailing from Continental ports or Britain distributed passengers more evenly among the three classes of travel. As a result, passengers who arrived at New York from a Mediterranean port in these years are more likely to be found on a manifest than those sailing from Britain or Northern Europe, because those sailing from the Mediterranean were more likely to travel in steerage. If one really looks, reading the lists page by page, one may find a New York cabin-class passenger list from the years 1897 to 1903, but if we assume all the cabin-class passenger lists are missing, the data suggests we are missing nearly 138,000 names in 1900 alone—and passengers who sailed from Britain or the Continent are much more likely to be missing. The lowest percentage of steerage passengers (0 percent in 1900) was for the Wilson, Leyland, and Atlantic Transport lines—all sailing from British ports. These typically were cattle ships, and the first-class passengers reported principally were cattlemen (U.S. citizens and young British and Irish men). A search of Ancestry.com for 1900 arrivals of Leyland Line ships (Philadelphian, Cestrian, Caledonian, Iberian, Georgian), Wilson Line ships (Buffalo, Colorado, Ontario, Consuelo, Toronto), and Atlantic Transport ships (Marquette, Mesaba, Manitou, Menominee, Minneapolis, Minnehaha) got no hits. In fact, an Ancestry search for any passenger named “John” got no hits on Wilson line ships at New York between April 1897 and August 1903. Little had changed by 1902. The North German Lloyd ship Friedrich der Grosse from Bremen arrived at New York on August 26, 1902, with 1015 passengers. Only 534 (54 percent) of these were in steerage, more than the manifest pages would suggest. Even if one counts those who did not sail and double‑counts those detained and held, the number of names on the manifest pages still falls far short. Furthermore, ships from the Mediterranean continued to carry more passengers in steerage than in cabins, in contrast to ships sailing from Britain or the Continent (see tables). The only exception to this general rule was the Hamburg American’s Union Line service from Hamburg, where the ships Pisa, Milano, Barcelona, and Albano carried 100 percent of predominately Russian, Austrian, and Hungarian passengers in steerage. Hamburg American’s Regular Service carried the most immigrants to New York in 1902, but only 84 percent traveled in steerage. As in 1900, those passengers sailing Allan State from Glasgow are most likely to be “missing.” It would be helpful to have the same shipping line data for years prior to 1899 to see if the same discrepancies noted above appear in ships arriving between 1892 and June 1897 or prior to 1892. Yet, even if we had the data, the inconsistency of 19th-century Customs Lists (missing ships, missing pages) would always leave room for doubt. Nevertheless, I found reports of the New York State Commissioners of Emigration from the early 1870s reprinted by Arno Press, and these contained a few similar tables.8 I selected a number of ships from 1871 and their passenger statistics and compared them to the total number of “hits” for those ships in 1871 on Ancestry.com. The New York State numbers were compiled from Castle Garden (the predecessor to Ellis Island) manifests and are in remarkable agreement with Ancestry’s count of names on the Customs Lists. This lends credence to the conventional wisdom that the Customs Lists are complete, and the omission of cabin-class lists only occurred on Ellis Island, probably beginning in 1892. But because we rely on Customs Lists to mid‑1897, it is only the period June 1897 to early 1903 that lacks cabin-class pages. Data for the years since 1903 demonstrates that the Immigration Service collected, maintained, and later microfilmed manifests for all passenger classes, despite the fact that a decreasing percentage of passengers traveled in cabin class. For this example, I chose three January 1903 arrivals, one from the three different departure areas. Beginning in January 1903, the Ancestry.com totals are always higher than or very close to the shipping line totals. This is in marked contrast to the years 1899–1902, when the numbers were always lower unless all the passengers traveled in steerage. This new trend continued in later years, as can be seen in similar data from 1906. For example, the Anchor Line’s ship Astoria arrived at New York from Glasgow, a British port, on November 23, 1906. The adoption of government‑issued forms for different classes of passengers allows us to count passengers on the manifest pages according to class. In the 1906 Astoria case, the data matches almost exactly. The difference of two is probably explained by Ancestry.com’s indexing of passengers who did not sail. A second 1906 example reinforces the proposition that post‑1903 New York lists are complete. Missing Names The results of this simple study suggest that the vast majority of passengers who arrived at New York from January 1903 onward on a regular commercial carrier should be documented on a passenger list (even if illegibly). Those who cannot be found since 1903 may be persons traveling under an assumed name, including children traveling with relatives under another family name. Or they may have been seamen who jumped ship prior to May 1, 1917, and so are not documented in crew lists. The data also shows that Ellis Island records from at least 1899 (and presumably June 1897) to early 1903 are comprised of steerage passengers only, with few exceptions. Hence, as a rule, passengers who traveled in first or second (cabin) class will not be found. Furthermore, the passenger data shows that ships sailing from the Mediterranean tended to carry most or all of their passengers in steerage and thus increased the possibility of that passenger’s name surviving on a record today. Most ships from British and Northern European ports carried a lower percentage of passengers in steerage, decreasing the chance of finding a particular passenger on a surviving list. Passenger data of 1903 and 1906 agrees almost exactly with corresponding manifest records, demonstrating that all classes of passenger lists can be found on the microfilm after January 1903—(even if every immigrant cannot!). https://www.avotaynuonline.com/2009/04/just-how-were-passenger-manifests-created-by-sallyann-amdur-sack-pikus-editor/
Census1940 United States - Afschrift volkstelling - Johann Joseph Schledorn - Huishouden

NameRelationHomeV/RFarmSexRaceAgeCondAMSchoolR/WBPFBPMBPLangImmNatEngOccupationIndustryCodeEmpWorkUnempVetWar
Johann Joseph SchledornheadM74W22Bundesrepublik DeutschlandBundesrepublik DeutschlandBundesrepublik DeutschlandArbeider
Johann Joseph ‘Joe’ SchledornzoonM47M28NederlandBundesrepublik DeutschlandBundesrepublik Deutschland
Frans Nicolaas ‘Frank’ SchledornzoonM45M26NederlandBundesrepublik DeutschlandBundesrepublik DeutschlandLandarbeider
Maria Johanna Agnes Elizabeth LawyerdochterF42M21NederlandBundesrepublik DeutschlandBundesrepublik Deutschland
Aloysius Theodorus ‘Al’ SchledornzoonM39M28NederlandBundesrepublik DeutschlandBundesrepublik Deutschland
Bernardina Angela Maria ParmenterdochterF31M23NederlandBundesrepublik DeutschlandBundesrepublik Deutschland

BirthGeboorte Johan Joseph Schledorn (1892)Geboorte Johan Joseph Schledorn (1892)
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EmigrationJohann Joseph Schledorn - passagierslijst (1912)Johann Joseph Schledorn - passagierslijst (1912)
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EmigrationJohann Joseph Schledorn - passagierslijst (1912), p. 2Johann Joseph Schledorn - passagierslijst (1912), p. 2
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ImmigrationJohann Joseph Schledorn - passagierslijst (1912)Johann Joseph Schledorn - passagierslijst (1912)
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ImmigrationJohann Joseph Schledorn - passagierslijst (1912), p. 2Johann Joseph Schledorn - passagierslijst (1912), p. 2
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